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December 12 2013

5 Career Resolutions for the New Year

By David McMillin

2014 career resolutions

There’s no better time to evaluate where you stand with your career development than the beginning of a new year. Before the ball drops on December 31, make sure you’re thinking ahead to determine how you can create new opportunities for your future in the new year.

To get you started, here are five career resolutions for 2014.

1)  Keep your online presence up-to-date.

When you’re not actively looking for a job, it can be easy to forget to stay active on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, but these forums represent opportunities to establish your expertise and extend your network. Don’t let your personal profiles start to look like a desert with no posts, no discussions and outdated information. In 2014, make sure you’re managing these platforms on a regular basis. Upload a current photo. Make your voice a part of the conversation. Respond to connection and friend requests.

SEE ALSO: Proof that Social Media Can Make or Break Your Job Search

2)  Invest in your own education.

There is always more to learn. Even if you’ve managed to climb the ladder to a leadership position within your organization, it’s important to find continuing education courses to stay in-the-know about what’s new and what’s next in the industry. As technology continues to change the way the meetings industry works, advanced-level knowledge can distinguish you as a forward-thinking expert.

SEE ALSO: PCMA’s OnDemand Education Opportunities

3)  Expand your address book.

While you’re focused on managing your current clients and working with your existing colleagues, it’s important to keep looking for your next potential business partner. In 2014, make a focused effort to meet new people and reestablish professional relationships. From catching up over coffee to attending face-to-face networking receptions, it’s crucial to make time to make connections.

SEE ALSO: 5 Ways to Make Your Meeting a Better Place to Network

4)  Do more than work.

Hiring managers sift through mountains of resumes when looking to find the right candidate for a new position. With that in mind, you’ll want to offer more than a list of the salaried roles you have fulfilled. In 2014, look for volunteer opportunities in professional associations to showcase your commitment to advancing the entire industry -- not just your own career. Those volunteer roles can also make for great talking points during interviews.

5)  Stop wasting your vacation days.

2014 isn’t all about focusing on what you can do in the office or where your next big career move will be. It should also be about rewarding yourself and taking advantage of one of the major perks of a steady job: the chance to leave your office. As the new year begins, take a look at your calendar to figure out when you can plan a getaway. A well-deserved break will reinvigorate your approach to your everyday duties when you return.

SEE ALSO: Don’t Forget to Do This Before the End of the Year

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